Do you think Cornwall would make an interesting country? Kenny says yes and here’s why...

With the news last week that the Cornish have finally received ‘national minority’ status, I thought I’d share my reasoning as to why I think Cornwall would make an interesting independent country. Here you go...

 

Language

The Cornish already have their own language, Kernewek. This was spoken throughout much of Britain before English dominated. You may have seen it on road signs during your UK family holidays?

Kernewek | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

Kernewek is protected under the European Charter for Regional or Minority Languages and has recently been granted £120,000 funding for development.

 

King Arthur

On the windswept cliffs of North Cornwall, 30 minutes from Widemouth Bay Caravan Park, stands Tintagel Castle.

Tintagel Castle | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

The castle is widely believed to be the birthplace of legendary leader King Arthur, who led the defence of Britain against Saxon invasion in the early 6th century.

 

Beaches

Cornwall’s beaches are regarded as some of the best in the world. Small unspoilt coves vary from the long stretches of golden sand found across the 476km coastline.

Cornwall Beach | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

In 2014 The Marine Conservation Society Good Beach Guide tested 82 of Cornwall’s beaches, with an astonishing 100% pass rate in water quality. Team that with a wide selection of family and dog-friendly beaches, and they’re a match for any country.

 

Art

St Ives is a major centre for British art and has produced some of the most exhilarating pieces of the twentieth century.

St Ives Holiday Village attracts art enthusiasts from around the world on their UK short breaks – with the area’s undeniable natural beauty and the pull of numerous exhibitions and galleries, including Tate St Ives, it’s no wonder why.

Tate St Ives | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

 

Landmarks

Cornwall has become famous for its iconic landmarks such as St Michael’s Mount, Land’s End and The Minack Theatre – an open-air theatre carved into the cliffs just 20 minutes from Kenegie Manor.

Also an abundance of protected National Trust spots feature throughout the County, keeping the area unspoilt and ready to discover for visitors on their UK weekend breaks.

 

Population

Population | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

Cornwall already has a population of 532,300 (taken from 2011 Census). This would make it the 40th most populous Country in Europe – larger than Malta, Iceland and Andorra but marginally smaller than Luxembourg and Montenegro.

 

Food

Since Rick Stein opened The Seafood Restaurant and Jamie Oliver Fifteen Cornwall, the area has become a hot spot for foodies!

Fifteen Cornwall | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

The fresh seafood and locally sourced produce celebrated in Cornwall’s restaurants rival anything from the continent in my opinion.

 

History

Cornwall’s mining past is represented with 10 World Heritage Sites doted across the region.

Mining | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

Its unique identity has evolved from history going back 3000 years and the rich culture still lives on today, through an interesting range of museums, castles and ancestral houses.

 

Wildlife

High on the list of what makes Cornwall so unique is its varied wildlife.

It’s one of the best counties in the UK for discovering the rarest species, including birds like Hoopoes and Wrynecks and marine life like Basking Sharks, Bottlenose Dolphins and Minke Whales.

Basking Shark | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country

 

Sub-Tropical Gardens

With over 40 magical gardens to visit, you don’t need go abroad for the sub-tropical jungle experience.

The 200-acre Lost Gardens of Heligan, 30 minutes from Perran View Holiday Park, were asleep for over seventy years. Now after the largest garden restoration project in Europe they’re alive with themed gardens, romantic pleasure grounds and a lush sub-tropical garden.

Garden | John Fowler’s 10 reasons Cornwall would make an interesting country